Religion Hobbyists

Motorcyclists wave at one another when they pass on the road. And, because the number of motorcyclists keeps increasing every year, I joke about attaching a fake waving hand to my handlebar to let the other bikers know I really do see them and appreciate the camaraderie however I want to keep my hands on the handlebar Fortunately, motorcycling is a hobby for most bikers and the horde is only out on weekends.

I started motorcycling as a hobby but soon discovered my bike takes less fuel than my car and so I amped up on the bikes usage. I’ve driven my motorcycle across the United States and I now use it for my job as a newspaper correspondent or to run errands. Previously, I’d only drive on smooth paved roads in perfect weather with a destination of an ice-cream shop. But over the years, I’ve become accustomed to driving on gravel rutted roads and in rain or snow, with the sole purpose to save gas.

The one thing I can absolutely count on is that no matter where I go publicly, I probably am coming into contact with a motorcycle hobbyist, though their bike and gear are back in the garage, barn, or storage. If I accidently dump my bike, they will instantly, quicker than I can blink, be there to help me pick up the too-heavy-for-me bike.

This biker experience has opened my eyes to the detail that religion hobbyists exist. Granted, the media and the empty churches blare the fact that religion as we know it yesterday is fading. We hear ad-nauseam about the religious fanatics or purists who believe their view of religion is pure and superior thereby justifying them to blow up or boot anyone who has another view. But, when push comes to shove, the greater population has a faith, religiously well-cared for and ready for action—like those motorcycles.

Granted, some people aren’t all that interested in faith or religion. They could be identified with Felix who told Paul, as read in Acts, “You may leave. When I find it convenient, I will send for you.” Paul had been talking about God, and Felix was pretending to listen but eventually sent him away. Felix wasn’t bored. His mind was elsewhere, he was expecting to get money from Paul, which wasn’t happening.

Anyway, for some reason years ago, I mistakenly stereotyped Felix as a religion hobbyist. Until I was revising Mary Baker Eddy’s Science and Health and came across this statement, “The advanced thinker will perceive and advocate Mind-healing and it’s Science. Other people will say, ‘That’s enough for now! You may leave. When I find it convenient, I will send for you.’”

Basically, I was aware of the great and increasing population of people in the world who are pursuing improvement by means of a higher power or mental source, even God. The world does have advanced thinkers even if many are not affiliated with a religious denomination. They are serious religion/faith hobbyists if you will. Actually, many of the people are more than hobbyists because they live their spirituality every day, not only on Sunday. Needless to say, this fact was a relief to my mind and being, because I now trust and see expressions of faith and love more so around me, even if people keep their religious or spiritual gear and equipment at home.

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5 thoughts on “Religion Hobbyists

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