Reviewing Christian Science, part 6

Q. What is the scientific statement of being?

A. There is no life, truth, intelligence, nor substance in separate minds. All is infinite Mind and its infinite manifestation, for God is All-in-all. Spirit is divine Truth; divisible matter is human error. Spirit is the real and eternal; matter is the unreal and temporal. Spirit is God, and we are Spirit’s image and likeness. Therefore, individuals are not things, but ideas of one Mind.

Think on this:

The definition of scientific  involves a system or method. I think of it as a linear thought process. It can become unscientific when veering off with thoughts that don’t stay in line with a reachable goal.

Example: Mathematics is a science. To learn how to do math, we first learn numbers, then addition and subtraction. Then calculus. It’s a linear process starting out with simple ideas and leading to more complicated ideas.

To get to the moon, a lot of math is necessary.

If we started out learning numbers and then learned how to cook pancakes, the science of math still exists but the effort to get to the moon became unscientific. We may have pancakes to eat but the more difficult math problems probably won’t get figured out.

Same with the scientific statement of being. “Being” is defined as existence, actual life. Mind, nature. Self.

To get to the goal of staying with scientific being, the thought process doesn’t divert off to believe being is human or mortal. The thought process stays with Being as Spirit, divine Mind and us as spiritual and mindful.

We first learn qualities of God such as wise and loveable. Then we learn how to give forth those qualities. Then we learn about the qualities of patience and humility. The more difficult problems may be learning how to give forth all Godlike qualities during changeable, divisive, or horrible circumstances.

When we think about our self, we know our self as idea, image, of Spirit and intelligent Mind.

The situation becomes unscientific or broken when we treat our self as chaotic or broken. No doubt, things get complicated or broken but they ultimately have no scientific statement of being. But, that which is un-Godlike has no ultimate existence. That which is unspiritual or unwise is not a part of our being.

When we keep in mind, Spirit and our spirituality, Love and its reality, existence is, and we are. Being.

From the Bible, II Kings 5, we read about a little girl who was captured. She became a slave of Naaman’s wife.

Naaman was a captain of the army of Aram. He was a great man, valiant, well-liked and respected, however he had a disease called leprosy.

The little girl told the wife that there was a man in Israel, Elisha, who could heal Naaman.

After a bit of negotiation between leaders, Naaman did go to Elisha, along with his horses and chariots, to be healed. Before he got to Elisha’s house, Elisha sent a servant out to tell Naaman, “Go wash in the river Jordan seven times, and you’ll be healed.”

But Naaman was disgusted and angry. He wanted a big show. He wanted Elisha to come out and call upon God and make Naaman look like a grand hero. Or at least go wash in a nicer river than the Jordan.

But a servant calmed Naaman down and told him the point isn’t doing something great in the world but following humility and health. So, Naaman did wash himself seven times in the Jordan and he was healed.

Scientific being remains in God.

 

snowy tree march 2019

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Raising Children Without Church: new book

Introduction to my newly released book: Raising Children Without Church: Finding God in Everyday Activities.

Raising Children Without Church introduces children to God through everyday activities. It’s not a pushback on religion or a push-forward to raise trendy spiritual kids. It simply accepts faith and meaning as alive and everywhere, unconfined to physical places of worship or churchy systems.

Raising Children Without Church uses information you have, or can easily get online, and translates it on the side of God. It addresses the individual and social needs of children affected by stresses that come with the demands of relationships, work, nature, technology, and yes, religions of the world.

This book faces the fact that religion formed the past, influences the present, and will reach far into the future. We can deal with faith rationally and for the benefit of family. To get the most out of reading Raising Children Without Church, it may help to see religion as a method, used like other methods to discover and understand, such as the methods of science, art, mountaineering, and parenting. Who hasn’t learned from a child?

Raising Children Without Church focuses on skills that nurture and build reputable individuals and lifestyles. I didn’t invent these skills. They’ve been tested and modified for millennia and produce transcending results even when up against damaging forces.

Forces aren’t meant to dominate or scare us. They do, however, require a fight or at least an effort on our part to translate the forces to the side of divine purpose.

Topics covered in this book:

  • Eating together
  • Music
  • School
  • Gardening (you don’t need land)
  • Pets
  • Art
  • Walks
  • Bible ABCs
  • What about God?

Raising Children Without Church carries the language of Christianity because that is my background. Don’t make it a big deal. You can adapt my words to fit your needs; for example, the word God can be replaced with Good, Truth, or Love.

Exploration takes time, just as it takes time to read this book. And because your time is valuable, I wrote concisely. When reading, highlight parts that speak to you and write your own thoughts on the pages. Cherish and grow meaningful thoughts right along with the children and family.

Cheryl

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Reviewing Christian Science, 5

From 21st Century Science and Health:

“Question. What are the requirements of the Science of Soul?

“Answer. The first requirement of this Science is, “You shall have no other gods before me.”[1] This me is Spirit. Therefore, the command means this: You shall have no intelligence, no life, no substance, no truth, and no love, except the unlimited. The second command, you shall “love your neighbor as yourself”[2] is like the first.

“It should be thoroughly understood that all people have one Mind, one God and Parent, one Life, Truth, and Love. The fulfillment of real identities will be realized as that fact is understood. War will cease and true sisterhood and brotherhood will be established. When we have no other gods and turn to no other but the one perfect Mind to guide us, we then experience our God-likeness, pure and eternal, having that Mind which was also in Christ.

“Science reveals Spirit, Soul, as reflected by spiritual beings. Soul is not in a body, but is reflected by spiritual beings. The belief that the eternal reality can be constrained in relative matter is an error that creates problems. A leading point in the Science of Soul is that Principle is not controlled by its idea. Spirit, Soul, has never been confined to human beings. If we reason from effect to cause, we will believe God created mortal humans, and sure enough, physical existence and God becomes a mystery. We cannot interpret Spirit, Mind, through inconsistent perceptions, different for different people. So, improve the thought process; reason from cause to effect and Spirit will be found giving the true mental perception.

“Reasoning from cause to effect in the Science of Mind, we begin with Mind, which must be understood through the idea which expresses it and cannot be learned from changeable ideas. We arrive at Truth or intelligence, which evolves its own complete idea, when we don’t equate reality with human illusions. If Soul sinned, it would be mortal. Sin is mortal because it kills itself. If Truth is immortal, error must be mortal, because error is unlike Truth. Because Soul is immortal, Soul cannot sin, for sin is not the reality of being.

In thinking about this…

A definition for science is knowledge. The knowledge of Soul or Spirit has one intelligence, life, substance, truth, and love. It is content in circular love.

Up against the common images of separate bodies and beings, the knowledge of Soul presents images of one Mind, getting along with constructive purpose. The body of Soul reflects essence and spirit, liveliness.

The body of Spirit has no boundaries. It doesn’t droop. The body of Soul embraces sinless cause and effect. The knowledge of Soul naturally eliminates human illusions and emotions because Soul’s ideas are substantial.

[1] Ex. 20:3; Deut. 5:7

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[2] Matt. 19:19, 22:39; Mark 12:31; Luke 10:27; Rom. 13:9; Gal. 5:14; James 2:8

Reviewing Christian Science, 4

Q. What are spirits and souls?

A. To human belief, they are personalities composed of consciousness and unconsciousness, life and death, truth and error, good and evil. Divine Science reveals how those contrasting terms don’t agree or conform to one another. Truth is indivisible; error is divisible. Truth is limitless; error is limited. Truth is intelligent; error is non-intelligent. Moreover, Truth is real, and error is unreal. This last statement contains the point you will most reluctantly admit, although first and last it is the most important to understand.

The terms souls, spirits, or human beings are as unsustainable as the term gods. Soul or Spirit signifies infinite Being and nothing else. There are not finite souls, spirits, or beings. Soul or Spirit means only one Mind and cannot be rendered in the plural. Mythology and human philosophies have perpetuated the fallacy that intelligence, soul, and life can be divided and confined, and thereby materialized. Idolatry and ritualism are the outcome of all human-made beliefs. The Science of spirituality comes with tool in hand to separate the chaff from the wheat. Science will declare God aright, and Christianity will demonstrate this declaration and its divine Principle, making humankind better physically, morally, and spiritually.

Think about this…On one side of the coin we have individual people. Everyone should have their own rights and life. On the other side of the coin we have humanity, the collection of all individuals. Getting along challenges individuals to act as a whole unit. But of course, we bump into problems because our diversity overwhelms unity.

For other solutions, let’s back up.

If we back up to the sides of the coins, it’s apparent each individual is assigned a different spirit or soul to make up the diversity and thereby make unity a super-challenge.

So, back up farther. Don’t focus on the sides of the coin.

Let’s keep the coin but start thinking with the coin itself. The coin is one Spirit. Now, move to the coins sides. Each individual reflects the one Spirit in their own way, plus as a whole unit.

Diversity isn’t different/separate persons or spirits, but diversity signifies the ever-expansion of one Spirit, the multi-color of one Soul, the ongoing proliferation of beauty.

Bing pink bush

Thursdays in Black

Thursdays in Black #TiB aims toward a world without rape and violence. Historically, the movement is traced to the 1970s when Argentinian women protested for protection from violence and rape. Flowing and ebbing over time, Thursdays in Black has spread globally. March 15, I attended a panel discussion at the Church Center for the United Nations in New York City. Hosted by Ecumenical Women of the United Nations, a panel discussion. Four men dialogued on progress and potential for a world without gender solicited destructive behavior.

Toxic masculinity was defined broadly, not necessarily by gender or male human beings, but by attitudes; threatening attitudes that bully and harm. I talk in my memoir, I Am My Father-Mother’s Daughter, about negotiating the attitude of masculinity. Here is the chapter:

Keeping It Straight

The farmer’s market got a reputation. Officials from other markets, including from the Seattle Pike’s Place Market, visited Pasco to watch its operation. I’d give them tours and answered questions. They took notes. The standard comment to me was, “I can’t believe you don’t have theft problems.”

The comment tempted me to pat myself on the back. I diligently prayed for honesty and believed my prayers had positive effects. Cash was the main currency. In the crowded hubbub, purses were opened and closed. Pants pockets were dug through for money and dollar bills were handed to farmers, who threw the money in shoeboxes and crates.

In an apron tied around my waist, I carried thousands of dollars from paid vendor fees, even serving as the local bank for change. Theft was only mentioned once.

A vendor noticed a pair of handcrafted wooden earrings missing from his rack. Two weeks later he told me, almost incredulously, “Cheryl, those earrings reappeared on the table.”

My prayer for honesty was fine and good, but I knew the people and atmosphere had a lot to do with it. The customers genuinely appreciated the fresh produce, handed to them by the very people who put their hearts and souls into the products. The vendors were from family farms, not corporations. There was no middleman to dilute the authenticity. The good outweighed the bad.

Not that it was all hunky-dory. Irritation, jealousy, and plain old weariness crept in periodically to throw us off guard. Fortunately, we’d help one another get back on track quickly, even when we didn’t know it. Like the time a woman helped me correct myself.

It was a scorching August day when more than seventy vendors showed up. I wiped salty perspiration from my eyes and was menstruating, not always a trouble-free task for me. I moved cautiously so blood wouldn’t start rolling down between my legs. People kept asking me for help, keeping me from walking across the street to where the bathroom was located.

I watched three vendors walk up to me at once, all talking, or rather complaining. When they were standing within an arm’s reach in front of me, I held up my hand, palm out as a stop sign. They stopped and quieted. I pointed to the person I figured would be the quickest to deal with. “I need change for this $50,” he said. I made the change.

I pointed to the second person, who said, “I need plastic bags.”

“You can buy some bags at stall three,” I answered, and then looked at the woman who stood with an agitated, indignant expression on her face.

“You told me to sell from stall fifteen and there is no way I can get in that stall. Do you see all these people? I have a truckload of peppers and tomatoes and need to get them out of the sun. It’s impossible to get in stall fifteen. I’ve tried. There’s no way.”

In the middle of her verbal explosion, I saw a thought pass through my head that harkened unmistakably: Women like you are why we are considered the weaker, dumber sex.

Though feeling annoyed, I said to her, “Please take me to your truck and I will help you.” I followed and asked her if it’d be okay if I backed her truck into stall fifteen. She gave me her keys and within two minutes she was selling her produce, relieved and happy.

Oddly, I wasn’t happy with myself. I felt a bit chastened.

When walking to the bathroom. I quickly realized I’d judged the woman alongside the thought that some women feed male chauvinism. I’d spent my life dodging male chauvinism because plenty of men treated me with prejudice, as if I was weak and dumb. So, why would I entertain what amounted to a male chauvinist thought?

Later in the day, I took the time to answer that question the best I could. It dawned on me chauvinism wasn’t gender specific. It was simply narrow-mindedness, a laziness that doesn’t help others. I would be adding to it if I accepted that thought about the woman that had passed through my head earlier. I mentally re-routed my thinking to admit it was chauvinism that annoyed me, not the woman. I affirmed that I didn’t help the woman because she was daft, but because I could help her in a way she understood. We were equals.

It was an exercise in breaking apart thoughts and reconnecting useful thoughts to get a more inclusive picture. The exercise helped me later when reading the Bible at home.

I read the story about Elisha who met a distraught mother in debt. She was about to lose her sons as payment for the debt. Elisha asked, “What do you have in your house?”

The mother had some oil.

Elisha instructed her to borrow a bunch of jars. When she poured her little bit of oil in the jars the oil multiplied miraculously. She sold the oil and paid off the debt.

It was the question, “what’s in your house,” that shifted my mental strategy. Instead of thinking and acting from the premise that I lack, why not ask what I have?

I had food, shelter. I even had stuff in storage, nearly forgotten. We certainly had family love. And then whomp, the thought to foster children landed in my creaked-open mind. I needed to share family love.

I went to the phone and called the State Social Services Department. A social worker came to our house to start the process of licensing me and Doug as foster parents. She examined our house, nodding in approval. Where I saw puny, she saw modest. Where I saw ugly, she saw practical. Where I saw cheap, she saw affordable and clean. Within a few weeks, 2-year-old Junior came to live with us.

Leah and Carly didn’t mind a stitch when we moved their clothes dresser out of their bedroom into the kitchen so we could fit a crib next to their bunk bed. The girls had fun showing Junior the swing set and forts.

Unexcitable by physical color, shape, or size, Junior ambled as fast as his chubby legs could carry him to keep up with the girls. He adored hugs and book reading time.

Junior helped solidify in my mind the concept of a Father-Mother God that cares for us all. With a divine Parent, the temptation to condemn his human parents died off.

We continued fostering children for the next fifteen years.

I learned that I never lost what I didn’t have. I learned that I can increase what I have.

ecumenical panel against violence

Four member panel

ecumenical show of hands on violence

Audience raises hands if knows of or experienced violence against women and girls

Ecumenical Women meet

On a whim, I attended an orientation for Ecumenical Women at the United Nations, last Saturday.What impressed me most?

  1. That I was unaware of this infrastructure to helping women and girls.
  2. That I am now aware of large scope of Ecumenical Women at the United Nations.
  3. Our need to reach the potential of women and children.

During a panel discussion, a woman from Sweden spoke. I couldn’t help but notice the contrast yet similarities between her dialogue and the woman next to her, from Brazil. Sweden is pro-women and equality. Brazil lags behind in women’s rights and equality yet women know the power of connecting and reaching for greater possibilities.

Lopa Banerjee, Director of Civil Society Division of United Nations Women spoke. In the photo below, courtesy of Ecumenical Women of the U.N., the Reverend Dionne Boissiere thanks Banerjee for speaking. I liked when Banerjee showed how policies insisting on equality and better care for women and girls is an investment, not expenditure. (I am the person in the background, wearing a white shirt and holding a blue book. Clapping)

at ecumenical women

Radio interview, Monday

A heads-up:

The Warwick Chamber of Commerce Director interviews me about my books on Monday, March 11, at 12:30 p.m.

WTBQ (local Warwick station)

AM 1110

FM 93.5

snowy tree march 2019

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