Lessons from wildlife

We had lunch with our neighbors last Sunday and learned about a PBS film, My life as a turkey.

After a local farmer left a bowl of eggs on Joe Hutto’s front porch, his life was forever changed. Hutto, possessing a broad background in the natural sciences and an interest in imprinting young animals, incubated the eggs and waited for them to hatch. As the chicks emerged from their shells, they locked eyes with an unusual but dedicated mother. One man’s remarkable experience of raising a group of wild turkey hatchlings to adulthood.

Hutto learned to make 30 different turkey noises to communicate with his brood.

He learned the turkeys have feelings.

The turkeys tried to understand their surroundings.

The turkeys were born with an innate understanding about other animals. They knew to stay away from venomous snakes.

The film reminded me of the oneness of our world. In divine Science, there is one Mind, one intelligence, and all inhabitants apparently can image this forth.

From 21st Century Science and Health: When we admit that matter (hormones, DNA, neurons, etc.), acting through the five physical senses, constitutes a person, we fail to see how physiology can distinguish between humanity and animals. Animals also have hormones, DNA, and neurons. Do some pets act more humane than people? Physiology and anatomy have a difficult time determining when people are really people.

wild turkey

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