The History of Spirituality V

Leah and Anthony in front of Paul Revere's house

Leah and Anthony in front of Paul Revere’s house

Leah (daughter) and Anthony (her boyfriend) arrived on campus after my Tuesday class. We grabbed a quick bite to eat before getting on the trolley train into Boston. The weather had cooled down, thankfully. Our destination: The Freedom Trail.

Mapped out through the city, a red line takes you on a walk through history. We started at the Boston Common, the oldest American public park. Over 1000 Redcoats made camp on the Common during the British occupation of Boston in 1775.

Nearby is the Massachusetts State House, built in 1798, and the Park Street Church, with its 217 foot steeple. Park Street Church hosted an anti-slavery lecture series as early as 1823. Down the road is the Granary Burying Ground, established in 1660, the resting place for Boston’s notables.

When walking in the King’s Chapel, we had to sit down and admire the booths, instead of rows of pews. It never occurred to me that the British (King’s men) had their own churches separate from the emerging American’s.

The Old Corner Bookstore published works by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Harriet Beecher Stow, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and Louisa May Alcott.

Balcony on Old State House where the Declaration of Independence was read from

Balcony on Old State House where the Declaration of Independence was read from

The Old South Meeting House, built in 1729 as a Puritan meeting house, was also the stage for some of the most dramatic events leading up to the America Revolution. Most prominent was the December 16, 1773 when it was decided to throw over 30 tons of tea into the bay water in rebellion against taxing.

By time we made it to the Old State House, it dawned on me we were only two days away from the July 4 anniversary, when the Declaration of Independence was read from the balcony year 1776.

The stand for independence deserved my appreciation.

Back to class.

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