Getting to Know Dandelion

Upstate New York is flourishing with dandelions. A magnanimous carpet of soft yellow flowers is cheering spring weather forward—to the dismay of some lawn caretakers. Dandelions, in all their brightness, are seen by some people as pesky weeds, a blot in their picture perfect lawns.

It’s all a matter of interpretation.

Although no one begrudges a dandelion-less lawn, the pretty yellow flowers do not need to discombobulate our thought process. Everything our physical senses sees, hears, and feels is temporal. We can let it go and engage our spiritual senses which can detect and lead into the experience of that which is ongoing such as composure and calm, even getting to know the dandelion.

Dandelion is a hardy perennial. There are hundreds of species of dandelion. Some can grow to nearly 12 inches in height. Dandelions have deeply notched, toothy, spatula-like leaves that are hairless and rather shiny. The spatula-like leaves funnel rain to the root. The dark brown roots have one main tap root. The fleshy root is filled with a white milky substance that is bitter and slightly smelly. Dandelion flowers open with the sun in the morning and close in the evening.

Dandelion has been used in traditional Native American and Arabic medical systems. The leaves and roots are used fresh or dried in teas, capsules, or extracts. Dandelion use is generally considered safe however use should be discussed with your health care provider. Dandelion is a rich source of vitamins A, B complex, C, and D, as well as minerals such as potassium, iron, and zinc. Dandelion leaves add flavor to salads, sandwiches, and teas. The roots are used in some coffee substitute, and the flowers are used to make wines.

From 21st Century Science and Health, “Nature voices spiritual law and divine Love, but the human mortal mindset misinterprets nature. Arctic regions, sunny tropics, coral reefs, the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, flowering deserts, and galaxies—all point to Mind, the spiritual intelligence they reflect. The floral apostles are hieroglyphs of Deity. Quantum mechanics, gravity, and the cosmos teach grand lessons. The stars make night beautiful, and the leaf turns naturally toward the light.”

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2 thoughts on “Getting to Know Dandelion

  1. Pingback: Getting to Know Dandelion | Healing Science Today « Feeds « Theology of Ministry

  2. Pingback: Exploring God is Like Exploring Nature - Everyday Spirituality

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